Home » Jacob - An Autobiographical Novel by Irving Fineman
Jacob - An Autobiographical Novel Irving Fineman

Jacob - An Autobiographical Novel

Irving Fineman

Published simultaneously inMoreIRVING F I. N, M-. 4 N AN AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL NOVEL And he came to Us - father, and said. My Father. And he said, Here am I who art thou, my son GENESIS RANDOM HOUSE NEW YORK FIR S PRINTING Copyright, 1941,
ISBN : 9781406721959
Paperback
308 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

IRVING F I. N, M-. 4 N AN AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL NOVEL And he came to Us - father, and said. My Father. And he said, Here am I who art thou, my son GENESIS RANDOM HOUSE NEW YORK FIR S PRINTING Copyright, 1941, by Irving Fincman Published simultaneously inMoreIRVING F I. N, M-. 4 N AN AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL NOVEL And he came to Us - father, and said. My Father. And he said, Here am I who art thou, my son GENESIS RANDOM HOUSE NEW YORK FIR S PRINTING Copyright, 1941, by Irving Fincman Published simultaneously in Canada by The Macmilkn Company of Canada Limited Manufactured in the U. S. A, by H. Wolff, New Yorl Jacob c, lo Y, . ou WERE born in the early morning of a rainy day in the autumn on a Thursday. Since the week before, Rachel, your mother, had begun several times to labor but each start had proved false. On Tuesday I was sent for to attend to a matter of busi ness in a town some distance away. It would mean my be ing gone overnight and I was loath to leave Rachel and risk missing your coming. But you would be days yet, said the ones wise in such matters and your mother, suffering patiently among them, said to me, smiling wanly, You know that Becky will not come so long as you wait for her. It was one of her womanly superstitions that there is a perversity in events that you have to fool destiny and that you can trick fate by tempting this perversity. For that reason, and because in her heart she dearly wished to bear me a son, all during the pregnancy she insisted on your being a girl to be named after my mother, Rebekah. I was foolish enough to try to point out to her that, con-3 trary to her own belief, she had tempted fate from the very first month when she had been busily making num berless garments those stacks of diapers, of tiny shirts, of blankets and bedding, all prepared for a creature not yet in sight. Her look was scornful. But I knew there was going to be a baby. She spoke with a new tone of indisputable authority which seemed tohave come with pregnancy, What sex it will be or just when it comes is another matter. Go on, Jacob. Your going will hasten its coming. Anyway, you are only delaying matters with such talk. Well, I took her advice. I rose early on Wednesday morning. I kissed her as she lay in bed, helpless under that great, incredible mound you had raised on her beautiful body, and rode off. It was a fine fall day, mild and golden. Heaven and earth and the rising sun sang the proud pleasant paean in my heart. In the town, feeling invincible, I made excellent deals and in one of the shops toward evening I bought your mother some giftsan old silver brooch of exquisite workmanship and a bag of polished alligator, which seemed to me grotesque, but which she had once expressed a wish to have. Then I went to bed at the inn, intending to finish my business the next day. But I was wakened from sound sleep. It was still night and someone stood by my bed with a light. Your wife is in great labor. She is calling for you I sprang from bed and dressed, stumbling and fumbling in my haste, and rode away through pitch blackness and falling rain. I rode fast not proudly now, but anxious-Thunder rolled in the hills and lightning flashed in the endlessly long and winding, flooded roads. Grey dawning light slowly suffused the heavens and the heavy downpour of thick grey rain, but neither sky nor earth were visible. I rode for hours as if swimming through stormy seas, re membering how I swam with Rachel in the sunny sea the day you were conceived. . . . Then too I had to be away from home but it was winter, and your mother, who, before you came, was ever eager for diversion and a chance to share my interests, when she heardI would be going down to the warm sea islands had pleaded to go with me, despite the dangers and incon veniences of life in such outlandish places. I took her with me. That day, then, being fine, I said I would take her to a place I knew along the shore of the island we were on, an unfrequented spot where we might bathe in the sea. Rachel had gathered a savory lunch she was ever pleased with an occasion to prepare good foodand we were just set ting out when a message came, this time with news not of birth but of death. My mother, Rebekah, had died...